TRIPTYCH FOR TWO

This piece explores the role that transformation and interpretation play in creative processes. It examines a meta-level transformation in which an entire piece is transformed through reinterpretation by another artist. Composer Simon Eastwood asked artist Oleksiy Koval to reinterpret his…

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This piece explores the role that transformation and interpretation play in creative processes. It examines a meta-level transformation in which an entire piece is transformed through reinterpretation by another artist. Composer Simon Eastwood asked artist Oleksiy Koval to reinterpret his composition Triptych for Two in any way he saw fit, with no brief other than to use this music as a starting point.

The original musical work itself was written as an abstract study in rhythm and time, intended to be evocative without necessarily conjuring anything in particular. The first movement explores two conflicting pulse streams, related by a ratio of three against four. Each part develops according to its own logic, guided by two different Lindenmayer Systems that mimic the organic growth of natural organisms. The second movement, on the other hand, has an extremely regular pulse and instead develops a long arc of tension and release which unfolds over the course of the movement. The third movement works with larger blocks of sound, which are cut up and then spliced together to create a dynamic interplay between the two instruments. It briefly restates musical material from the previous two movements, ending the set with a fiery and energetic flourish.

After listening the original recording, Koval decided to respond to the work in real-time by creating a digital painting which unfolds as the piece progresses. This interpretation takes its structure from the musical composition, but by expressing that composition though another medium transforms the way in which we perceive the piece. In particular, Koval’s movement from black to white to black again creates another layer of structural complexity not present if one listens to the recording alone. By showing the creation of the painting over time, the relationship between the surface (the screen) and the way in which the artist applies colour to that surface is expressed. Much in the same way that one can observe the brush strokes on a static painting, the movements on the screen express the process of creation for this artwork.

The music is performed by Naoto Segawa and Monique Lapins, who perform as a violin and percussion duo in Wellington, New Zealand.

Composer
SIMON EASTWOOD

Violin
MONIQUE LAPINS

Snare drum
NAOTO SEGAWA

Recording Engineer
JESSE AUSTIN-STEWART

Adam Concert Room,
New Zealand School of Music,
Victoria University of Wellington
25th of April 2018

Painting
OLEKSIY KOVAL

I thank
MICHAEL GENE AICHNER
CLAUS STIRZENBECHER
VERONIKA WENGER
for their precious collaboration
in the making of this painting and video.

The Beautiful Formula Casa, Munich
22nd of June 2018

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